Aymptomatic hsv 2 dating

Many (18%) thought they were uninfected, but found out they were herpes carriers when they underwent blood tests.It's not too hard to find people who carry the virus, as 16% of Americans have HSV-2 infections.Some think of people like Peckham as immoral, assuming only people who sleep around get genital herpes.The stigma of the virus, which exists at the heart of this faulty mindset, is usually worse than the symptoms themselves, as it affects dating, social life and psychological health.It’s true that the majority of the time, genital outbreaks are symptomatic of HSV II, but you can be infected by either type in either location, or even have both types in a given location — which makes me think that, functionally speaking, distinguishing between oral and genital infections is pointless.If you can asymptomatically shed the virus from any point of your body and it can infect any point of another person’s body, isn’t any type or location of herpes just…herpes?I think she said she takes the medication that is used during an outbreak, not daily.

Instead, what keeps this 27-year-old from approaching the cute girl across the room is a set of hypotheticals that most people don’t deal with.“My mind runs ahead to ‘the disclosure talk’ and then all the way down to, ‘What if we have sex and what if I give it to her? Would you consider dating someone who informed you that they genital herpes? I say that with the realization that I don't know just *how* difficult it is to prevent transmission, and whether that means there can't ever be spontaneous sex.And if it seemed like too big a hurdle to overcome, then we could go our separate ways. One of my best friends has had to deal with that for over 20 years.And nearly all the time, these people had no obvious sign of herpes infection while they were actively shedding virus."The primary concern of many HSV-2-seropositive persons is the risk of transmission to sexual partners; in our experience this is the main source of angst in patients with genital herpes," Wald and colleagues note in the April 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.